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Infinite Menus, Copyright 2006, OpenCube Inc. All Rights Reserved. Monday, September 26, 2016
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ABC News(ORLANDO, Fla.) -- Hillary Clinton’s running mate Tim Kaine made an emotional visit to the Pulse nightclub, the site of the Orlando massacre, Monday along with former Congresswoman Gabby Giffords, who was gravely injured in a 2011 shooting.

Giffords, along with her husband Mark Kelly, greeted Kaine at the nightclub, and the two hugged.

Giffords, who was shot while meeting with constituents in 2011, is in Florida to attend a debate watch party organized by the Human Rights Campaign that Kaine will also attend tonight. Both Giffords and Kaine walked into the club’s parking lot, taking time to see the pictures, candles and words people have left to remember those lost in the shooting.

Kaine left white roses at the site. Giffords and Kelly also left white flowers.

They were joined by Florida Sen. Bob Nelson, Orlando Police Chief John Mina and Chad Griffin of the Human Rights Campaign.

As the visit ended, a visibly emotional Kaine walked up to reporters. He cried as he whispered into the camera.

"This is a weird thing to say but I always hoped that the Virginia Tech one would be the worst one ever...as bad as that was, I hoped that nothing would ever eclipse it but, such as life we got work to do so,” said an emotional Kaine.

Kaine was governor during the Virginia Tech mass shooting and has called it the worst day of his life. The decision to visit the site of the Orlando shooting and pay his respects was something the senator asked to do, a campaign aide said.

The Orlando shooting left 49 dead.

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ABC/Ida Mae Astute(NEW YORK) -- While the biggest attraction during the presidential debate Monday night will be the two candidates on stage, at least some attention will likely be paid to those in the audience.

Here's a look at who the candidates invited to sit in the audience at Monday night's debate:

Hillary Clinton

Hillary Clinton's campaign Sunday morning released a partial list of guests invited by the Democratic presidential nominee to the debate at Hofstra University in New York.

The four women on the list are all supporters who have developed a special relationship with Clinton over the years. They include a 9/11 survivor; a single mom and domestic abuse survivor; and a woman who became a pen pal to Clinton when she was the first lady.

The list also includes Anastasia Somoza -- a woman with cerebral palsy who was recently featured in a campaign attack ad about Donald Trump's mocking of a disabled reporter.

Most notably, the Clinton campaign has also given Dallas Mavericks owner and Trump antagonist Mark Cuban a front-row ticket for the show.

Chelsea Clinton is also expected to attend, according to a spokeswoman for the former first daughter.

And, the Clinton camp said Monday morning it is hosting 1,200 debate-watch parties across all 50 states Monday night.

Clinton's running mate Tim Kaine will attend a watch party in Orlando, Florida, organized by the Human Rights Campaign. Former Congresswoman Gabby Giffords and her husband, astronaut Mark Kelly, will also attend that event, an aide said.

Donald Trump

On Monday morning, reports emerged that the Republican nominee invited Mark Geist, one of the survivors of the attack on the U.S. Embassy in Benghazi, Libya, to attend the debate.

Geist has been vocal in his support of Trump's candidacy; he spoke on the first night of the Republican National Convention alongside fellow security contractor John Tiegen about the attack in Benghazi.

Trump also over the weekend fired off a tweet about a possible guest to the debate. After Mark Cuban posted about his plans to attend the event in support of Clinton, Trump tweeted Saturday: “If dopey Mark Cuban of failed Benefactor fame wants to sit in the front row, perhaps I will put Gennifer Flowers right alongside of him!”

Bill Clinton admitted in the 1990s to having had a sexual relationship with Flowers two decades earlier.

On Sunday morning, Trump campaign manager Kellyanne Conway told ABC's This Week that Flowers, "has not been invited by the campaign."

However, the Clinton camp used Trump's tweet to accuse the Republican nominee of acting unpresidential.

"He's a reality TV star. He’s very experienced at providing television entertainment. The presidency is not about entertainment. It’s about serious decisions," Clinton's campaign manager Robby Mook told ABC News’ George Stephanopoulos Sunday.

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Win McNamee/Getty Images(HEMPSTEAD, N.Y.) -- Police escorted Green Party presidential nominee Jill Stein off Hofstra University’s campus Monday afternoon before Monday night’s first presidential debate.

Authorities encountered Stein on the college campus in Hempstead, New York, and asked the third party candidate, who has not garnered enough support to participate in the debates, to show the proper credentials, which she could not do, police said.

She was “nicely escorted” off the grounds around 2:30 p.m. ET, a Nassau County Police Department spokesman told ABC News.

Stein also tweeted about the incident, saying she was on campus “doing an interview” when police put her and her team “in a van” and escorted them out. Earlier, Stein’s campaign said she had obtained a credential to come in and do interviews at the media filing center in the early afternoon.

Stein had planned to challenge her exclusion from Monday night’s event by hosting a rally outside the secured perimeter of the debate hall beginning around 5 p.m. ET. She said she will be live on Twitter’s Periscope app answering the same questions as Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton and Republican nominee Donald Trump on the debate stage.

Stein’s campaign said she will not “risk arrest” this time, because there is an outstanding warrant for her arrest over her involvement in a recent protest against a controversial pipeline project in North Dakota. Still, her campaign spokeswoman Meleiza Figueroa said they will attempt to get the “spirited demonstration … as close to the gates as possible."

In 2012, Stein and her running mate were arrested outside Hofstra University when they tried entering the premises during a presidential debate between President Obama and then-Republican nominee Mitt Romney.

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iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- For the first time in President Obama’s tenure, the Senate is set to override his veto of a bill that would allow the families of 9/11 victims to sue Saudi Arabia in U.S. courts.

The president vetoed the bill Friday, citing concerns that it could open the U.S. government to similar lawsuits.

"Our concern extends not just to the impact this would have on our relationship with Saudi Arabia, but rather the impact that this could have on the United States' relationship with countries around the world,” White House press secretary Josh Earnest told reporters Friday.

The White House is also concerned that the bill could tarnish the U.S. relationship with the Gulf nation. Saudi Arabia has itself spoken critically of and personally lobbied against the effort, maintaining it had no role in assisting the 9/11 terrorists.

But the bill passed with unanimous voice votes in both the House of Representatives and the Senate, meaning the veto override, set for a Senate vote Wednesday and House vote by Friday, will likely get the two-thirds majority in both chambers needed to pass.

“I look forward to the opportunity for Congress to override the President’s veto, provide these families with the chance to seek the justice they deserve, and send a clear message that we will not tolerate those who finance terrorism in the United States,” Senate Majority Whip John Cornyn, R-Texas, said in a statement Friday.

Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton has also indicated she would sign the legislation into law if she wins the presidential election.

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JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- Almost 20 percent of Americans surveyed said they could change their mind about the presidential election based on Monday night’s face-off between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton, according to the latest ABC News/Washington poll.

In fact, 6 percent of Americans said there’s a “good chance” that Monday night could swing their vote one way or another -- more than the margin between the two candidates in most national polls over the last month.

Here are the groups to watch for during Monday night’s debate:

1. Young voters. Almost 3 in 10 young voters (28 percent) polled said they could switch their vote based on Monday night’s face-off between Clinton and Trump. A broad 60 percent of these voters went for President Barack Obama in 2012, but many are threatening to vote for third-party candidates Gary Johnson or Jill Stein this year.

2. People who don’t like either candidate. A good number of Americans surveyed who said they don’t like either major party candidate said they could change their minds Monday night. Twenty-seven percent of Americans who have an unfavorable view of both Clinton and Trump said they could change their minds, versus only 13 percent of those who like at least one of them.

3. Bernie Sanders supporters. A quarter of Americans polled who backed the Vermont senator during the Democratic primaries (26 percent) said they might flip candidates based on Monday night’s debate. Only 74 percent of them said they’re voting for Clinton, with 9 percent going for Trump and 12 percent split between Johnson and Stein.

4. Independents. A quarter of Americans (24 percent) surveyed who are not affiliated with either political party said their votes could be up in the air during Monday night’s debate. Trump has a statistically insignificant advantage among this group, 43 percent to Clinton’s 38 percent, with 10 percent going for Johnson and 2 percent for Stein.

5. People who are on the fence about voting. People who might not show up to the polls are also more likely to consider switching their votes. Only 11 percent of Americans polled who have followed the race “very closely” and 14 percent of those who were “absolutely certain” they will vote said they could change their minds. That’s compared with 24 percent and 25 percent of those who have followed the race less closely and were less certain to vote, respectively.

6. Unenthusiastic voters. Respondents who were “very enthusiastic” about voting for Clinton and Trump were largely set in stone: Only 9 percent of “very enthusiastic” Clinton backers and 3 percent of “very enthusiastic” Trump supporters said they could change their minds. That’s compared with 22 percent of less enthusiastic Clinton backers and 18 percent of less enthusiastic Trump supporters.

7. Weaker partisans and ideologues. Very strong partisans were less likely to be open to changing their votes Monday night: Just 10 percent of strong conservatives, 12 percent of liberal Democrats and 6 percent of conservative Republicans said the debates could change their votes. White men without a college degree (13 percent) and people who make $100,000 per year or more (11 percent) were also less likely to be open to a flip Monday night.

Poll results come from an ABC News/Washington Post poll released on Sept. 25. The survey was conducted by landline and cellular telephones Sept. 19 to 22, 2016, in English and Spanish, among a random national sample of 1,001 adults, including 651 likely voters. Results have a margin of sampling error of 3.5 points, including the design effect, for the full sample and 4.5 points for likely voters.

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(WASHINGTON) -- Ahead of Monday night’s big showdown between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump, there’s another ongoing discussion -- whether or not moderators should fact-check candidates during the debates.

The diverging views came after Fox News' Chris Wallace, who is moderating the third and final presidential debate, said it is not his job to judge the accuracy of the candidates' statements in real-time.

"I do not believe that it’s my job to be a truth squad. It’s up to the other person to catch them on that," Wallace told Fox News earlier this month. "I certainly am going to try to maintain some reasonable semblance of equal time. If one of them is filibustering, I’m going to try to break in respectfully and give the other person a chance to talk."

Over the weekend, both of the nominees’ campaigns managers, as well the executive director of the Commission on Presidential Debates, Janet Brown, weighed in on the role of moderators as fact-checkers.

Brown echoed Wallace’s view, arguing that it’s better for a moderator to facilitate and "for the candidates to basically correct each other as they see fit."

"I have to say, in our history, the moderators have found it appropriate to allow the candidates to be the ones who talk about the accuracy or the fairness of what the other candidate or candidates might have said," Brown told CNN in an interview on Sunday. "I think, personally, if you start to get into the fact-check, I am not sure what is a big fact, and what is a little fact? And if you and I have different sources of information, does your source about the unemployment rate agree with my source?"

The Clinton campaign feels otherwise.

"All that we're asking is that, if Donald Trump lies, that it's pointed out," Clinton campaign manager Robby Mook said Sunday on ABC News’ This Week.

"It's unfair to ask for Hillary both to play traffic cop with Trump, make sure that his lies are corrected, and also to present her vision for what she wants to do for the American people," he said.

Mook argued the fact-checking during the debate is necessary because this is a "special circumstance."

"We normally go into a debate with two candidates who have a depth of experience, who have rolled out clear, concrete plans and who don't lie, frankly, as frequently as Donald Trump does," Mook continued. "So we're saying this is a special circumstance, a special debate, and Hillary should be given some time to actually talk about what she wants to do to make a difference in people's lives. She shouldn't have to spend the whole debate correcting the record."

Trump’s campaign manager Kellyanne Conway responded to the Clinton campaign’s push for fact-checking during Monday night’s face off.

"I really don't appreciate campaigns thinking it is the job of the media to go and be these virtual fact-checkers and that these debate moderators should somehow do their bidding," Conway said in her interview on ABC News' This Week.

Trump himself has also said the job of NBC’s Lester Holt, who will be wrangling Monday night's first debate, is to allow the candidates to correct one another.

"I think he has to be a moderator," Trump said on Fox and Friends last Thursday. "If she makes a mistake or I make a mistake, we'll take each other."

"I certainly don't think you want Candy Crowley again," Trump said of the CNN moderator who famously fact-checked Mitt Romney during the second 2012 presidential debate against President Obama. "I really don't think that you want that. That was a pivotal moment in that debate and it really threw the debate off and it was unfair."

Trump continued, "I think you have to have somebody that just lets them argue it out."

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Alex Wong/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- When Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump take the debate stage at Hofstra University Monday night for the first -- and highly anticipated -- presidential debate of the general election, Gary Johnson will watching on television some 30 miles away in Twitter's Chelsea office in Manhattan -- armed only with a Twitter handle.

The campaign for the Libertarian Party nominee is hoping to interject his voice into the debate from the sidelines through an aggressive Twitter and media strategy.

Both Johnson and his running mate, former Massachusetts Gov. Bill Weld, will be live-tweeting throughout the evening.

"Govs. Johnson and Weld will be making themselves available to the media, watching the debate with great interest, and will be anxious to point out how a third voice, representing millions of independent voters disenfranchised by the Republican and Democrat parties, would better serve the American people,” campaign communications director Joe Hunter told ABC News in a statement.

He added, “They will be respectful and not interested in any grandstanding for the cameras or inappropriate 'protests.'"

Green Party candidate Jill Stein will be challenging her exclusion from the debate by holding a rally outside the secured perimeter of the debate hall. However, Stein's campaign says she will not "risk arrest" given that there is currently an active warrant for her arrest from her involvement in a recent protest against a controversial pipeline project in North Dakota.

In 2012, Stein and her running mate were arrested outside Hofstra University when they attempted to enter the grounds during a presidential debate between President Obama and then-Republican nominee Mitt Romney. Instead, Stein plans to be live on Periscope during the debate, answering the same questions that are lobbed to Clinton and Trump on the debate stage.

Johnson failed to qualify for the first presidential debate after he fell short of the 15 percent polling threshold required by the Commission on Presidential Debate for inclusion. Johnson’s recent national polling average stands at 9 percent, with the most recent ABC News/Washington Post poll published over the weekend putting him at 5 percent.

Although he has previously said it would be “game over” for his campaign if he failed to qualify for the debates, Johnson now says that it is “an ongoing process” to try to reach the 15 percent threshold for subsequent debates this fall.

In an interview on ABC News' This Week on Sunday, Johnson criticized the Commission on Presidential Debates over its formula for deciding who will be included in the debates, saying that the panel is “made up of Republicans and Democrats that just have no intention whatsoever in seeing anyone other than a Republican or Democrat on the debate stage."

Johnson's campaign is also touting an online petition that has now garnered over one million signatures in support of Johnson being included in the debates.

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ABC News(NEW YORK) — As millions of voters tune in to watch the first presidential debate of the 2016 campaign, there are several key factors to keep in mind.

The general election has been playing out for about two months now, with Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton taking direct aim at one another, but Monday night will be the first time that they square off directly.

Watch the first presidential debate on ABC News and ABCNews.com at 9 p.m. ET. on Monday.


Debate Prep Plays Out on Stage

Clinton has been preparing for her 35th presidential election debate for weeks. Aides say the former secretary of state — who is known for doing her homework — has been poring over briefing books and practicing in mock debates with a Trump stand-in, whose identity has not been confirmed.

Clinton herself has said she expects it to be a "difficult, challenging" debate. Clinton's campaign has even consulted with The Art of the Deal ghostwriter Tony Schwartz on how to beat him in a debate.

Trump was in debate prep meetings all day Friday after focusing more on campaigning than studying up for the showdown. Though no mock debates occurred, the nominee was asked rounds of possible questions he will face from Monday night's moderator.

The sessions were led by former New York City mayor and current Trump surrogate Rudy Giuliani along with the campaign leadership.

Testing Their Tones


Acknowledging that there are concerns about his tone, Trump has repeatedly said that he plans to be "respectful" of his competitor, but only to a point.

"I'm going to be very respectful of her," Trump said during a interview on Fox News on Thursday.

"I think she deserves that and I'm going to be nice. And if she's respectful of me, that’ll be nice. We'll have something that I think people will respect as a debate but we'll see where it all goes. You really never know exactly how it's going to turn out and that's why we going to have a lot of people watching," he said.

For her part, Clinton and her team have spoken about how they had to prep for her to face off against one of two versions of Trump: the more professional, contained version that has been present on the trail more recently or the more bombastic uncontrolled version that was seen more during the primaries.

Famous Faces in the Audience


Chelsea Clinton will attend the debate, a first for her this election cycle after not attending any of the Democratic primary debates.

And another familiar face is expected to be in the front row supporting Team Clinton: Mark Cuban.

The billionaire Dallas Mavericks owner is a vocal Clinton supporter and reportedly went so far as to volunteer to play Trump in Clinton's mock debates. He said earlier this week that the Clinton team never returned his email offer, but they did keep him in mind for another move.

If Cuban is being put in the front row as some kind of psychological fake-out for Trump, the television audience shouldn't expect to enjoy his presence. Peter Eyre, a senior adviser with the Commission on Presidential Debates, the independent organization that sponsors the events, told ABC News that the viewing audience will not be in the camera shot during the debate.

All told, there are expected to be about 1,000 people in the viewing audience at Hofstra University Monday night.

The Role of the Moderator


Lester Holt from NBC's Nightly News has been tasked with moderating Monday night's debate, and he's under some pressure.

NBC hosted a Commander in Chief forum during which both candidates fielded questions about their plans for the military, but Holt's colleague Matt Lauer was widely criticized after the forum for his performance.

Critics complained that he focused more on Clinton's email scandal than anything to do with the military, and that he let Trump make claims that were false without any intervention.

The question of how much fact checking moderators should do during the debates has been raised. Trump has said that he does not believe the moderators should intervene to fact check, while Clinton raised money off Lauer's lack of fact checking after the Commander in Chief forum, indicating that she would be in favor of moderators playing a role.

The Spin Efforts Afterwards


While estimated tens of millions of people will be watching the debate in real time, many more are going to be influenced by the social media spin that happens in the aftermath, when the debate about the debate ensues online.

Clinton's campaign is well aware that the outcome of the debate isn't just about what the two candidates say on stage, but also about the conversation that takes place around it.

On a conference call with supporters on Friday, a top aide to Clinton directly asked their supporters to use social media during and after the debate to help shape the conversation positively around the Democratic nominee.

The campaign's digital director Jenna Lowenstein said that two of the campaign's goals for the night include amplifying Clinton's best moments online and influencing the narrative about who is winning.

"It's important that we're not just turning this into the Donald Trump show," Lowenstein said.

She instructed: "Tweet early, tweet her name, use those hashtags."


ABC Breaking News | Latest News Videos

Watch the first presidential debate Monday at 9 p.m. ET. Full live coverage and analysis of the debate will begin on ABCNews.com/Live at 7 p.m. ET.

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Mark J Sullivan/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- Israel's prime minister tweeted Monday morning about his meetings Sunday with Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton, saying, "After meeting with 2 leading candidates for POTUS, I'm more convinced than ever that Israel-US bond will remain strong after the elections."

Republican nominee Trump met with Benjamin Netanyahu Sunday morning at Trump Tower. Democrat Clinton met the Israeli leader in the evening at The W Hotel USQ in Manhattan.

Netanyahu was in New York for the United Nations General Assembly meeting.

The press was barred from covering Trump's meeting with the prime minister but offices for both said they discussed Israeli security and efforts to achieve peace in the Middle East. Their meeting lasted over an hour and included discussions of the Iran nuclear deal, of which Trump and Netanyahu are fierce critics; military assistance; security; and regional stability.

"Mr. Trump recognized that Israel and its citizens have suffered far too long on the front lines of Islamic terrorism," said a statement from Trump’s office. "He agreed with Prime Minister Netanyahu that the Israeli people want a just and lasting peace with their neighbors, but that peace will only come when the Palestinians renounce hatred and violence and accept Israel as a Jewish State,”

According to Netanyahu’s office, "Prime Minister Netanyahu thanked Mr. Trump for his friendship and support for Israel.”

Trump, in 2013, recorded a video endorsing Netanyahu.

Clinton met with the Israeli leader in the evening.

A post on the Israeli prime minister's Facebook page said the meeting lasted nearly an hour and included Israel's Ambassador to the United States, Ron Dermer and Jake Sullivan, a policy adviser to Clinton's campaign.

"PM Netanyahu discussed with Secretary Clinton a broad range of issues relating to advancing peace and stability in the Middle East as well as the potential for economic growth through technological innovation," the statement said. "Mr. Netanyahu thanked Secretary Clinton for her friendship and support for Israel."

The candidates' meetings with the Israeli leader take place a day before Trump and Clinton face off at their first general election presidential debate Monday night at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York.

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ABC/Ida Mae Astute(NEW YORK) -- The race between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump has narrowed to essentially a dead heat nationally in the latest ABC News/Washington Post poll, raising the stakes dramatically for the first presidential debate Monday night.

A vast 74 percent of Americans plan to watch the debate. And while eight in 10 say it won’t change their minds, that leaves more than enough to shift the balance in an increasingly closely fought contest, with unprecedented levels of qualms about both major-party candidates.

Trump, in particular, is running competitively despite persistent doubts. Around six in 10 Americans continue to see him as unqualified, untrustworthy, temperamentally unsuited or insufficiently knowledgeable of world affairs to serve effectively as president. Yet he’s capitalizing on strength in his core support groups and on Clinton’s own weaknesses, including concerns about her health.

You can see a PDF with the full results of the poll here.

In all, 44 percent of likely voters say they’d vote for Trump if the election were today, numerically his best since spring. Forty-six percent prefer Clinton, unchanged from an ABC/Post poll early this month and virtually unchanged since June. The 2-point gap between them is not significant, given the survey’s margin of sampling error. The race has closed from an 8-point Clinton lead in early August.

Support for third-party candidate Gary Johnson slipped to a new low, 5 percent in this poll, produced for ABC by Langer Research Associates, with the biggest departure among Republicans and GOP-leaning independents -- thus mainly benefiting Trump.

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ABC News(NEW YORK) -- Donald Trump’s campaign manager Kellyanne Conway on Sunday called the NBC Nightly News anchor who will preside over Monday night’s presidential debate a "respected, brilliant newsman," a sharp change in tone for the campaign, which in recent days has claimed that Trump will not be treated fairly in the debates.

"He’ll do a good job tomorrow night as a moderator," Conway said of Lester Holt.

Trump this past week said Holt will be under tremendous pressure to be tough on the Republican presidential candidate and called him a Democrat when in fact Holt is a registered Republican.

Conway took a much softer tone on Sunday, telling ABC News’ George Stephanopoulos on ABC's This Week that she trusts all the moderators for the upcoming debates and believes they will ask questions "that benefit the voter."

In advance of Monday’s event, the campaigns for Trump and Hillary Clinton have differed on whether Holt and the moderators of subsequent debates should fact-check the candidates or leave it to the Republican and Democratic presidential candidates to challenge each other’s statements.

The Clinton campaign has been pushing for moderators to act as a truth squad.

"All that we're asking is that if Donald Trump lies that it is pointed out," Clinton campaign manager Robby Mook said on This Week.

Conway, in her appearance on This Week, disagreed. She said moderators should stay out of the fray and not challenge candidates in instances where they may be bending, or breaking, the truth.

"I really don't appreciate campaigns thinking it is the job of the media to go and be these virtual fact-checkers and that these debate moderators should somehow do their bidding," she said.

In a bit of pre-debate hype, Conway likened Trump’s debating skills to a baseball legend, echoing a favorite line of Trump supporter Newt Gingrich.

Trump "is the Babe Ruth of debating," Conway said.

Asked about her expectations of the event, she said: "We certainly hope this debate tomorrow night will be about substantive issues."

As the first general election debate, it will be the first time Americans will see Trump and Clinton go head to head on the same stage, Conway said, adding that she wants it to be about "how do we defeat radical Islamic terrorism" and "how do we stimulate the economy."

"A victory for Donald Trump tomorrow night is answering the questions and showing America that he's ready to be president and commander-in-chief on day one," she concluded.

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ABC News(NEW YORK) -- Hillary Clinton's campaign manager Robby Mook said the campaign is concerned about a "double standard" at Monday night's debate where Donald Trump "lies" and still receives a "passing grade."

"All that we’re asking is that if Donald Trump lies, that it’s pointed out," said Mook on ABC's This Week. "It’s unfair to ask that Hillary Clinton both play traffic cop with Trump, make sure that his lies are corrected, and also to present her vision for what she wants to do for the American people."

Mook called Trump "special," explaining that in past election cycles, presidential candidates have laid out extensive plans before the debate on what they would do as president. The Clinton campaign fears that Trump's lack of details about his plans has lowered expectations for how well he answers questions from debate moderator Lester Holt.

"I think Hillary is going to have to press the point. I think she’s going to have to at times challenge him to reveal what his plans are," Mook told ABC News' George Stephanopoulos. "This is a time for him to present those plans and maybe he will, but we’ll have to see."

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George Frey/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- Gary Johnson, the Libertarian presidential candidate and former governor of New Mexico, said that the future of the human race will depend upon learning to inhabit other planets.

“We do have to inhabit other planets. The future of the human race is space exploration,” Johnson told ABC News’ George Stephanopoulos on This Week in offering a response on how to address the challenges posed by climate change.

Johnson was also asked about a comment he made about climate change back in 2011, when he said that “in billions of years the sun is going to actually and encompass the earth.” The Libertarian candidate said on Sunday that this remark had been a joke.

“Can’t we have a little humor once in a while?” he said. “And that is long term. Plate tectonics, at one point Africa and South America separated, and I am talking now about the earth and the fact that we have existed for billions of years and will going forward.”

Johnson vowed to stay in the race even though he won’t be on the debate stage with Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump on Monday night due to polls showing that support for his candidacy falls short of the 15 percent minimum set by the Commission on Presidential Debates as a standard of inclusion.

He criticized the Commission on Presidential Debates over their formula for deciding who will be included in the debates, saying that the panel is “made up of Republicans and Democrats that just have no intention whatsoever in seeing anyone other than a Republican or Democrat on the debate stage."

Although he has previously said it would be “game over” for his campaign if he failed to qualify for the debates, Johnson said Sunday that it is “an ongoing process” to try to reach the 15 percent threshold for subsequent debates this fall.

The Libertarian Party nominee has been pulling a 9 percent average in recent polls and registered 5 percent support in the most recent ABC News/Washington Post poll published Sunday.

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ABC News(NEW YORK) -- Donald Trump’s campaign manager, Kellyanne Conway, said Sunday that Gennifer Flowers has not been invited to the first presidential debate on Monday.

Bill Clinton acknowledged in the late 1990s that he had a sexual relationship with Flowers in the late 1970s, and in a tweet Saturday, Trump appeared to threaten to bring her to the debate.

“If dopey Mark Cuban of failed Benefactor fame wants to sit in the front row, perhaps I will put Gennifer Flowers right alongside of him!” Trump tweeted on Saturday. Flowers reportedly told The New York Times in a text message, “Yes I will be there.”

But in separate show appearances on Sunday, both Conway and Trump’s running mate, Indiana Gov. Mike Pence, indicated there is no plan for Flowers to be at the debate.

“She has not been invited by the campaign,” Conway said on ABC News’ This Week, referring to Flowers. “She has a right to be there if somebody else gives her a ticket.”

Pence appeared to go a step further, asserting on Fox News Sunday that Flowers “will not be attending the debate.”

Earlier this week, Hillary Clinton’s presidential campaign confirmed that they had invited Dallas Mavericks owner and Trump antagonist Mark Cuban to the debate at Hofstra University in New York.

Cuban endorsed Clinton in July, and a Clinton campaign aide told ABC News that he will have "one of the best seats we have available.”

Clinton campaign manager Robby Mook was asked in his appearance on This Week about the possibility of Flowers attending the debate.

Mook said the debate "is supposed to be about how the candidates are going to make a difference" in Americans' lives. "It’s a time for them to reveal their plans,” Mook told ABC News’ George Stephanopoulos. “If this is what Donald Trump wants this debate to be about, that’s up to him.”

Mook added on Trump, "He's a reality TV star. He’s very experienced at providing television entertainment. The presidency is not about entertainment. It’s about serious decisions.”

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ABC News(NEW YORK) -- A day after Mark Cuban announced he had a front row seat for the first debate courtesy of the Clinton campaign, Donald Trump threatened to have his own special guest.

On Friday, the billionaire Dallas Mavericks owner and Hillary Clinton supporter said he was invited by her campaign to sit front row for Monday's presidential debate at Hofstra University.

 

Just got a front row seat to watch @HillaryClinton overwhelm @realDonaldTrump at the "Humbling at Hofstra" on Monday. It Is On !

— Mark Cuban (@mcuban) September 23, 2016

 

Trump then tweeted on Saturday he would invite "Jennifer Flowers," then deleted the tweet to correct his spelling.

 

If dopey Mark Cuban of failed Benefactor fame wants to sit in the front row, perhaps I will put Gennifer Flowers right alongside of him!

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) September 24, 2016

 

"If dopey Mark Cuban of failed Benefactor fame wants to sit in the front row, perhaps I will put Gennifer Flowers right alongside of him!" Trump tweeted.

Gennifer Flowers has said she had a sexual relationship with Bill Clinton in the 1990's.

She tweeted to Donald: "You know I'm in your corner and will definitely be at the debate!"

 

Hi Donald. You know I'm in your corner and will definitely be at the debate!...????

— Gennifer Flowers (@gennflowers) September 24, 2016

 

The Clinton campaign issued a statement Saturday night in response.

"Hillary Clinton plans on using the debate to discuss  the issues that make a difference in people's lives. It's not surprising that Donald Trump has chosen a different path," said Clinton Communications Director Jennifer Palmieri in a statement to ABC News.

Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

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